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SOS: APPROACH TO FEEDING

The SOS Approach focuses on increasing a child’s comfort level by exploring and learning about the different properties of food. The program allows a child to interact with food in a playful, non-stressful way, beginning with the ability to tolerate the food in the room and in front of him/her; then moving on to touching, kissing, and eventually tasting and eating foods.

The Sequential Oral Sensory (S.O.S.) Approach to feeding is a trans-disciplinary program for assessing and treating children with feeding difficulties and weight/growth problems from birth to 18 years. The SOS Approach assesses the “whole child”: organ systems; muscles; development; sensory processing; oral-motor skills; learning, behavior and cognition; attachment; nutrition and the environment.

WHEN CHILDREN WON'T EAT

ASSESSMENT & TREATMENT USING THE SOS APPROACH TO FEEDING

The Sequential Oral Sensory (S.O.S.) Approach to feeding is a trans-disciplinary program for assessing and treating children with feeding difficulties and weight/growth problems from birth to 18 years. It integrates posture, sensory, motor, behavioural/learning, medical and nutritional factors to comprehensively evaluate and manage children with feeding/growth problems.

PICKY EATERS VS. PROBLEM FEEDERS

PICKY EATERS

  • Decreased range or variety of foods that will eat = 30 foods or more
  • Foods lost due to “burn out” because of a food jag are usually re-gained after a 2 week break
  • Able to tolerate new foods on plate and usually can touch or taste a new food (even if reluctantly)
  • Eats at least one food from most all food texture groups
  • Frequently eats a different set of foods than the rest of the family, but usually eats with the family
  • Will add new foods to repertoire in 15-25 steps on Steps to Eating Hierarchy
  • Sometimes reported by parent as a “picky eater” at well-child check-ups

PROBLEM FEEDERS

  • Restricted range or a variety of foods, usually less than 20 different foods
  • Foods lost due to food jags are NOT re-acquired
  • Cries and “falls apart” when presented with new foods
  • Refuses entire categories of food textures
  • Almost always eats different foods than the family
  • Adds new foods in more than 25 steps
  • Persistently reported by the parent as a “picky eater” across multiple well-child check-ups